FULBRIGHT TO INDIA 

In 2014/2015 I received a Fulbright Nehru research grant in the field of sculpture. For the better part of a year I lived in Varanasi India, researching the pollution of the Ganges river and ways in which that pollution is seen and understood by the millions of Hindus that worship the river as a Goddess.

The How to Feed Hungry Ghosts series was created in the first months of the grant. One of the oldest continually inhabited cities on earth, Varanasi is a sacred pilgrimage site to Hindus, who come to worship the Ganges river, perform rites, and cremate their dead.

In September, the city swells with pilgrims performing ancestor worship. It's a time when you will be warned to watch for hungry spirits swooping down to eat your head, causing that outburst of anger, flood of irritability, or loss of mind.

It was within the thickness of this atmosphere that the How to Feed Hungry Ghosts series was made.

My mother was born in Varanasi, it is where my grandparents fell in love, and the city my grandmother was named after. Yet, American born and raised, an ocean of cultural divide obscured a feeling of ancestry. The lineage of belief felt untouchable.

How to Feed Hungry Ghosts are a quiet meditation on the texture of these ancestral links: the texture of the city, and a rough quality of surfaces. They are a meditation on steel cups that hold water, on the eyes of the enshrined deities that follow everywhere, on the ornamentation of rickshaws and on the thin veils that hide pretty faces.

HOW TO FEED HUNGRY GHOSTS I

2015

aluminum, fabric, acrylic paint 

HOW TO FEED HUNGRY GHOSTS II

2015

aluminum, fabric, acrylic paint 

HOW TO FEED HUNGRY GHOSTS III

2015

aluminum, fabric, acrylic medium  

UNTITLED

2015

aluminum, fabric, acrylic paint